Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Moderator: satchmoa

Do you agree with Minnesota's new wolf hunting season?

You may select 1 option

 
 
View results

Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby bwca » Tue Feb 06, 2007 3:53 pm

Minnesota gray wolf recovery a success
Rhonda Silence, Cook County Star

Ask any Northlander if he or she has seen a wolf in the last month and the answer is most likely yes. Anecdotal evidence appears to show that the gray wolf population has increased. This was confirmed this week when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released population figures and announced that the Service is removing the western Great Lakes population of gray wolves from the federal list of threatened and endangered species. The action is being taken in recognition of the success of gray wolf recovery efforts under the Endangered Species Act.
Deputy Secretary of the Interior Lynn Scarlett made the announcement, stating, "Wolves have recovered in the western Great Lakes because efforts to save them from extinction have been a model of cooperation, flexibility, and hard work."
Gray wolves were previously listed as endangered in the lower 48 states, except in Minnesota where they were listed as threatened. The Service's removal of the gray wolf from the endangered and threatened species list applies only to the Western Great Lakes area, which includes Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan as well as parts of North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. The area includes all the areas currently occupied by wolf packs in Minnesota, Michigan, and Wisconsin, as well as areas in these states in which wolf packs may become established in the future.
Wolves in other parts of the 48 states, including the Southwest wolf population, remain endangered and are not affected by the delisting. The Fish and Wildlife Service is considering, but has not yet approved delisting for Northern Rocky Mountain wolves, whose range area includes northern Montana, Idaho and Wyoming, the eastern one-third of Washington and Oregon, and a small part of north-central Utah.
When the wolf was first listed as endangered in the 1970s, only a few hundred wolves remained in Minnesota. Recovery criteria outlined in the Eastern Timber Wolf Recovery Plan include the assured survival of the gray wolf in Minnesota and a population of 100 or more wolves in Wisconsin/Michigan for a minimum of five consecutive years. The recovery plan identified 1,250 to 1,400 as a population goal for Minnesota. The state's wolf population has been at or above that level since the late 1970s.
The Wisconsin/Michigan wolf population has been above 100 since the winter of 1993-94, achieving the latter numerical goal in the recovery plan.
The region's late winter gray wolf population now numbers approximately 4,000 and occupies portions of Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota. Wolf numbers in the three states have exceeded the numerical recovery criteria established in the species' recovery plan.
The Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin Departments of Natural Resources have developed plans to guide future wolf management actions. According to the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Minnesota plan will allow wolves to continue to naturally expand their range within the state. The plan, administered by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) divides the state into wolf management zones A and B. In Zone A (Northeastern MN), where 80 percent of the wolves reside, state protections would be nearly as strict as current protections under the ESA. The Minnesota protection plan goal is to keep the wolf population well above 1,600 in that zone. In Zone B (the remainder of the state), wolves could be killed to protect domestic animals, even if attacks or threatening behavior have not occurred. The Fish and Wildlife Service acknowledges that the wolf population in Zone B may decrease, that is acceptable since "such a result would be consistent with the federal recovery plan, which discourages the establishment of a wolf population in that area of the state."
Hunting and trapping of the gray wolf may or may not be authorized, depending on the state or tribal government responsible for gray wolf protection and management. Each entity must decide whether such activities will be allowed. In Minnesota, public hunting and trapping, except for depredation control, will not be considered until at least five years after the federal delisting.
Once the Service removes a species from Endangered Species Act protection, there are several safeguards to help ensure it continues to thrive, including a mandatory five-year monitoring period. The Service also has the ability to immediately relist a species on an emergency basis, if monitoring or other data show that is necessary.
The final rule removing gray wolves in the Western Great Lakes DPS from the list of threatened and endangered species will be published in the Federal Register. The rule becomes effective 30 days after publication; until that date, gray wolves remain under the protection of the ESA in the western Great Lakes area. The rule and other information about the gray wolf may be found at http://www.fws.gov/midwest/wolf.

What are your thoughts on the subject?
User avatar
bwca
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1551
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:00 pm
Location: Twin Cities

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 1

Postby Wolfwatcher » Fri Feb 16, 2007 6:29 pm

This just in from the International Wolf Center:

Some advocacy groups have filed a 60-day notice of intent to sue against the delisting of the wolf in the Western Great Lakes.

Stay tuned!
User avatar
Wolfwatcher
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Thu Feb 15, 2007 4:08 pm
Location: Kansas

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Postby Wolfwatcher » Thu Mar 22, 2007 9:10 pm

Nothing new. Here's a link to the Wolf Center for updates:

http://www.wolf.org/wolves/news/headlines.asp
User avatar
Wolfwatcher
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Thu Feb 15, 2007 4:08 pm
Location: Kansas

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Twelve conservation groups challenge federal wolf delisting

Postby bwca » Thu May 01, 2008 10:53 pm

For Immediate Release
• Earthjustice • Defenders of Wildlife • Natural Resources Defense Council • Sierra Club • Center for Biological Diversity • The Humane Society of the United States • Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance • Friends of the Clearwater • Alliance for the Wild Rockies • Oregon Wild • Cascadia Wildlands Project • Western Watersheds Project • Wildlands Project

April 28, 2008
Contact(s)
Suzanne Stone, Defenders of Wildlife, (208)424-9385 (office), (208)861-4655 (cell)
Louisa Willcox, Natural Resources Defense Council, (406) 222-9561
Franz Camenzind, Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance, (307) 733-9417
Kristina Johnson, Sierra Club, (415) 977-5619
Michael Robinson, Center for Biological Diversity, (575) 534-0360


Twelve conservation groups challenge federal wolf delisting
MISSOULA, MT— Twelve conservation groups are fighting for the survival of wolves in the northern Rocky Mountains. The groups today filed a federal court lawsuit challenging the federal government’s decision to remove the northern Rockies gray wolf population from the list of endangered species. Wolves should not have been delisted, the groups argue, because they remain threatened by biased, inadequate state management plans, as well as by the lack of connections between largely isolated state wolf populations.

The Fish and Wildlife Service’s premature decision to strip the protections of the Endangered Species Act from the northern Rocky Mountains’ wolves promises to undo the hard-earned progress toward wolf recovery of recent years. State laws that guide wolf management in the wake of delisting betray the states’ continued hostility toward the presence of wolves in the region. While ensuring that wolves can and will be killed in defense of property or recreation, Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana have refused to make enforceable commitments to maintaining viable wolf populations within their borders. The states have failed to keep track of recent wolf killings and also neglected to secure funding for essential monitoring and conservation efforts.

Actions by the states of Idaho, Wyoming and Montana, and by individuals, since wolves were delisted demonstrate the need to resume federal safeguards for wolves until state plans are in place that ensure a sustainable wolf population in the region. For example, on the very day delisting took effect — March 28, 2008 — Idaho Governor Butch Otter signed into law a new Idaho law allowing Idaho citizens to kill wolves without a permit whenever wolves are annoying, disturbing, or “worrying” livestock or domestic animals. Since delisting, Wyoming has implemented its “kill on sight” predator law in nearly 90 percent of the state. Not surprisingly, these hostile state laws have resulted in a wave of new wolf killings.

At present, wolves in central Idaho, northwestern Montana, and the Greater Yellowstone area remain largely disconnected from each other and wolves in Canada. The wolves of the Greater Yellowstone area, in particular, have remained genetically isolated since 31 wolves were introduced into Yellowstone National Park more than a decade ago. Moreover, the region’s population of 1,500 wolves still falls short of the numbers that independent scientists have determined to be necessary to secure the health of the species in the northern Rockies.

With continued recovery efforts, real wolf recovery in the region is within reach. Delisting further endangers wolves because of increased wolf killing, reduced wolf numbers, and less genetic exchange between wolf populations.

Earthjustice filed the lawsuit on behalf of Defenders of Wildlife, Natural Resources Defense Council, Sierra Club, Center for Biological Diversity, The Humane Society of the United States, Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance, Friends of the Clearwater, Alliance for the Wild Rockies, Oregon Wild, Cascadia Wildlands Project, Western Watersheds Project, and Wildlands Project.

Conservation Group Statements:
“The recent senseless and indiscriminate killings of wolves in Wyoming and Idaho clearly highlight the serious problems of the current state plans. Wolves need to be managed responsibly under plans that are based on current and reliable science. Running wolves down with snowmobiles and shooting the exhausted animals is not management – it’s far too extreme and unsustainable.”Suzanne Asha Stone, Defenders of Wildlife

“There is nothing in the state management schemes or delisting rule itself to prevent the killing of up to 80 percent of wolves in the northern Rockies. Attempts by the Fish and Wildlife Service to assure the public otherwise have no factual basis.” Louisa Willcox, Natural Resources Defense Council

“Wolves in the northern Rockies are just now on the cusp of biological recovery, but aren’t ready for delisting. Current state management allows for wolf populations to be cut by up to 80 percent. Since delisting, our worst fears are coming true. In Wyoming, wolves are being killed at an alarming rate, with over a dozen wolves killed so far.” Melanie Stein, Sierra Club

“Just as disturbing as the state management plans that permit killing of hundreds of wolves is the expected increase in federal predator control, including ramped up aerial gunning, leghold traps and even poisoning of wolves. Federal predator control on behalf of the livestock industry is what exterminated wolves in the first place, and that was before the era of helicopter sharpshooters pursuing radio-collared wolves. We will bring this alarming prospect to a court’s attention.” Michael Robinson, Center for Biological Diversity

“Idaho wins the prize for wanting to kill the most wolves. Wyoming wins for the most blatant hostility toward wolves enshrined in state law. And Montana wears the crown for killing the most wolves 8 of the last 10 years despite having the smallest wolf population of all three states.” John Grandy, Ph.D., senior vice president of The Humane Society of the United States

“We are concerned that Wyoming will strictly adhere to the language in the state legislation and aggressively eliminate wolves, some of which occupy Jackson Hole and parts of Grand Teton National Park. With Wyoming’s current plan, wolves two miles from Jackson’s Town Square could be killed by anyone at any time—this is reprehensible.” Franz Camenzind, Ph.D. Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance

“As evidenced by the of State of Idaho's proposals to aerial gun wolves in the Frank Church Wilderness and to kill up to 75% of the wolves on the Upper Lochsa while wolves remained protected, delisting at this time poses a great risk to the Northern Rockies wolf population, which is still recovering.” Will Boyd, Education Director, Friends of the Clearwater

“Legal action is necessary to prevent the states from implementing management schemes that have the primary purpose of eliminating, rather than conserving, wolves.” Michael Garrity,
Alliance for the Wild Rockies

"Oregon's wolves are considered part of the Northern Rockies population, yet only five wolves that have returned to Oregon since 1999, and two were illegally shot. Whether people in Oregon ever get the opportunity to see and hear wolves someday, depends upon strong federal endangered species protection that prevents unnecessary killing of wolves throughout the Northern Rockies." Steve Pedery, Conservation Director of Oregon Wild

“The sudden and bloody increase in wolf killings since delisting confirms that wolves remain at risk in the west. To ensure the survival of wolves these magnificent animals need to expand their range throughout the western states. There are many public lands across the west with abundant elk and deer populations that can and should sustain wolves.” Jon Marvel, Western Watersheds Project

“For thousands of years, people lived alongside vibrant wolf populations in what is now the U.S. west. Misguided efforts to eradicate wolves over much of the last 150 years seriously damaged the land and ecosystems on which all life depends. Americans started the healing process by returning wolves to their natural place in the scheme of things, but that is now being threatened by a return to 19th century thinking and politics.” David Johns, Wildlands Project

“The spate of wolf killings since delisting—including wolves chased down by snowmobiles and stalked at state-run feedgrounds in Wyoming—makes clear the need to reinstate protections for wolves under the Endangered Species Act.” Jenny Harbine, Earthjustice
User avatar
bwca
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1551
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:00 pm
Location: Twin Cities

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 1

Re: Grey Wolf to be Taken Off Minnesota Endangered List

Postby PaddlerJimmy » Mon Sep 29, 2008 4:37 pm

Court gives wolf control back to feds
John Myers
Duluth News Tribune - 09/29/2008

Management of timber wolves in the Great Lakes region has been handed back to the federal government under a federal court decision released today in Washington.

The ruling means that killing a wolf for nearly any reason in Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin immediately becomes illegal under federal law once again. The states had set up exceptions allowing some wolf killing by landowners, farmers and others.

Environmental and animal rights groups that had opposed taking wolves off the endangered species list claimed victory on Monday.

The decision by Judge Paul Friedman ruled that the federal government’s effort to remove only Great Lakes region wolves from protection under the Endangered Species Act, as a distinct population segment, was not supported by biology or law.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service moved in 2006 to remove wolves from the endangered species list and give control to state Departments of Natural Resources in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. The agency concluded that wolves had recovered from near-extinction in the 1960s and 1970s and had met the goals to restore their population in the region.

For the past two years, wolves have been under state management in those states. In addition to government trapping, all three states had allowed slightly more liberal wolf killing by livestock farmers, pet owners and landowners. Wisconsin officials also were mulling a wolf hunt at some point, while Minnesota had put that issue off until at least 2011.

But all those state plans now are on hold.

Filing suit against the de-listing effort were the Humane Society of the United States, Help Our Wolves Live, Born Free USA and Friends of Animals and Their Environment, who said wolves should be handled as a contiguous population. They argued that, because wolves still haven’t been restored to most of their historic range, the animal should keep its federal protection.

The groups oppose efforts by some states to move toward hunting and trapping seasons.

“Even across the three Great Lakes states, wolves aren’t recovered in all areas. And then there are all the other states that had wolf populations but no longer do,’’ Brian O’Neill, lead attorney for the Twin Cities-based Faegre & Benson law firm that handled the case for the groups, told the News Tribune. “If you ask me, 4,000 wolves are not that many across such a large area. ... And we see all three states with (wolf management plans) that could essentially cut the number of wolves in half. That’s not an acceptable situation.’’

Minnesota has about 3,000 wolves while Wisconsin and Michigan each have about 500 or more. But Minnesota’s wolf population has stopped growing and has even shrunk in recent years, a state survey found last winter, and has not grown in geographic area over the past decade as some wolf experts had predicted.

In July, a federal judge in Montana overturned a similar decision stripping wolves of all federal protection in the Rocky Mountain region, thus preventing Idaho, Montana and Wyoming from implementing wolf hunts as well.
User avatar
PaddlerJimmy
 
Posts: 331
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 9:18 am

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf to be Taken Off Minnesota Endangered List

Postby PaddlerJimmy » Wed Dec 21, 2011 2:08 pm

Great Lakes wolves to be off endangered list by year's end
Article by: JOSEPHINE MARCOTTY , Star Tribune 12/21/11

The Great Lakes great wolf will be taken off the endangered species list by the end of the year, Senator Amy Klobuchar announced Wednesday, a move that had been long exepcted and which conservationists say is long overdue.

There are now about 4,000 wolves in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan - about twice as many as in the west - about two-thirds of them in northern Minnesota. Many experts say, taking wolves off the endangered species list is likely to defuse much of the emotion around their status and the law itself, which in the long run may be the best way to ensure their survival.

The government has twice announced plans to de-list wolves in the Great Lakes area, and twice they went back on the endangered species list after environmental groups filed suit -- with sufficient time for public comment a key sticking point.

It's not clear at this point whether any group will file suit.
User avatar
PaddlerJimmy
 
Posts: 331
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 9:18 am

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf to be Taken Off Minnesota Endangered List

Postby diannecarter » Fri Dec 23, 2011 1:06 am

This is a very interesting topic! Just a while ago, I also read an article connected with this sensational issue. The post was entitled "Gray Wolves taken off Endangered Species List".

As we all know, for the past forty years, the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service has protected the population of the gray wolf in some states such as Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota. After expending millions of dollars on the survival of the said species, the recovery goals were met. The gray wolf will be taken off the Endangered Species List because the population of the wolves in the Great Lakes region are now strong and no longer need government protection.

However, the lifted protection could pave the way for wolf hunting seasons, and this is definitely a menace! That is why wolf relocation has been suggested so that they can thrive and not be hunted. Well, I just hope that wolf recovery will continue to aggrandize, and people must realize that gray wolves must not be feared because the key with wolves is human tolerance.
User avatar
diannecarter
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2011 12:58 am

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Minnesota Wolf Hunt

Postby PaddlerJimmy » Sat Mar 17, 2012 12:46 am

WolfPupsMum.jpg
Photographer Unknown
WolfPupsMum.jpg (13.77 KiB) Viewed 11706 times


So now that the wolf has been taken off the endangered species list.... they are already planning a wolf hunt this Fall. The Minnesota wolf population is about 3000 wolves and they hope to reduce that by 400 with the hunt. They plan to release 6000 licenses - TWICE THE POPULATION - and think they will bring in only 400.

Like Yesterday....
wolf0ld.png
Photographer Unknown


Like Today....
wolf2.jpg
Photographer Unknown


wolf1.jpg
Photographer Unknown


wolf3.jpg
Photographer Unknown
Last edited by PaddlerJimmy on Sat Mar 17, 2012 1:06 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
PaddlerJimmy
 
Posts: 331
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 9:18 am

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf to be Taken Off Minnesota Endangered List

Postby PaddlerJimmy » Sat Mar 17, 2012 12:49 am

wolf4.jpg
Photographer Unkown
User avatar
PaddlerJimmy
 
Posts: 331
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 9:18 am

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby cmurph » Fri Apr 06, 2012 1:02 pm

Absolutely, yes!
User avatar
cmurph
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2012 12:12 pm

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0
Tagswolf hunting, gray wolves, hunting, wolf hunting season, minnesota wolves, delisting, gray wolf, grey wolf, timber wolf

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby Bob Curtis » Fri Apr 06, 2012 1:04 pm

As long as it's controlled, well planned to keep them within healthy population levels, respectful, and doesn't endanger them again, then yes.
Bob Curtis
 

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby John Henderson » Fri Apr 06, 2012 1:05 pm

It seems the only people interested in hunting them are people that view them as pests. I fear we'll see wanton waste. With deer and moose we can at least be fairly sure that the hunters in general will not let the meat and pelt go to waste. Does anyone really eat wolf?
John Henderson
 

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby Todd Carlson » Fri Apr 06, 2012 1:07 pm

There never should have been a wolf hunting ban... Sorry, just being argumentative...
Todd Carlson
 

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby Donna Gestel » Fri Apr 06, 2012 1:09 pm

To maintain a healthy wolf population it needs to be managed just the same as the deer and moose.
Donna Gestel
 

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby David Drufke » Fri Apr 06, 2012 1:10 pm

Too low of a number of natural predators is the reason we have to manage deer populations. A healthy eco system manages itself.
David Drufke
 

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby Jen Ryan » Fri Apr 06, 2012 1:25 pm

While hunters do not waste the pelts I still think it is too soon. legal hunting also brings poaching, people that will use about any reason to shoot a wolf. I'm in southern mn for 6 yrs we lived on a property in a cougars home range. She left tracks across my deck, most everyone who lived there saw her. She once walked under my brothers deer stand and climbed a tree 10 ft from him and sat there. She never caused any problems, as hunters we say no real change in the deer population but the coyotes that were in my yard nightly, had eaten my cats, even ripping one apart on my front steps virtually disappeared. We lost 1 cat in that 6 yrs and that was to a trapper. My point Is if hunting were allowed or the restrictions lifted someone would have shot her within the 1st 3 mo. As long as the dnr I's capable of keeping any routes under control I see no reason for hunting to be allowed
Jen Ryan
 

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby Louis Muench » Fri Apr 06, 2012 2:11 pm

Manage them like other species with a carefully managed hunting season. There's no biological reason to not allow a limited hunt. I'm not sure what you mean by "legal hunting also brings poaching". I would argue the opposite. Wolves are currently being illegally shot, which I don't support, but the main reason it's being done is because of the absense of a legalized hunt or way to manage the population."
Louis Muench
 

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby Benjamin Ranallo » Fri Apr 06, 2012 2:12 pm

Poaching is poaching. Legal hunting is legal hunting. Legal hunting is legal. Poaching is illegal. I do not see a logical connection between the two. If one wishes to poach they will illegally kill an animal, regardless of whether or not there is a legal way for them to do it. Your reasoning connects law abiding citizens with criminals while I see no correlation what-so-ever. Your comment about the mountain lion has no relation to your comment about legal hunting bringing poaching. If there had been a hunting season for mountain lions in your area, and someone would have shot it licensed and in season, regardless if it was cleaning up your coyote problem or leaving your cats alone, the animal would have been shot legally, therefore it would not have been poached. Further, if someone would have wanted to poach your mountain lion, regardless of license or season mandates, they would have. Your just lucky no poacher wanted to kill her. There's no season on black rhinos in Africa, but poachers are killing them all the time. Making a wolf season allows law abiding citizens a chance to aid the state in managing a wildlife population as well as a ability to harvest a natural resource in a controlled manner. It also provides revenue for the state and puts citizens in a position to prevent poaching by showing an active interest in a wildlife population while also acting as eyes and ears for the DNR while they are legally hunting and scouting the areas where the animal lives. Connecting a legal activity to a criminal one is dangerous territory. It's the same reasoning we've seen in the gun control debate. It's attenuated and conclusory. I see no relation between the two.
Benjamin Ranallo
 

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0
Tagspoaching, coyote, wolf hunting, wolf season, wolf hunting season, hunting wolves, minnesota, mn, bwca, boundary waters, boundary waters canoe area wilderness

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby bluemoonphoto » Fri Apr 06, 2012 2:16 pm

I saw a wolf crossing Minnehaha parkway last week, right by the falls. He stood there in the road an looked at me like I was crazy (or he was crazy; probably a little truth in both) I don't really believe in guns, but if he was in my yard, he would get slingshot with a bunch of agates!"
bluemoonphoto
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2009 2:34 pm

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0
Tagswolf sitings, wolf sightings, timberwolves, wolf hunting, minnesota, minnehaha, minneapolis, wolf hunting season

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby Tressie Bloomquist » Fri Apr 06, 2012 3:04 pm

6000 seams like a lot, but I only see wolves now... no deer... no moose... no rabbits... no fox...most other animals are hunted/trapped why not wolves too? Everything in moderation.
Tressie Bloomquist
 

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby David Drufke » Fri Apr 06, 2012 3:21 pm

I see deer everywhere, including the Ely area and the BWCA. We have deer problems over most of the state... way too many deer, especially after this mild winter. What town are you near Tressie? I'd definitely take a drive up there if you are seeing wolves consistently.
David Drufke
 

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby bwca » Fri Jun 01, 2012 11:25 pm

DNR outlines wolf season details, seeks public comment

Minnesota's first regulated wolf hunting and trapping season will be conducted this fall and winter. The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is seeking public comment on details of the proposed season.

Consistent with state law, the state's first regulated wolf season will start with the beginning of firearms deer hunting on Saturday, Nov. 3.
The DNR is proposing to split the season into two parts: an early wolf hunting season coinciding with firearms deer hunting; and a late wolf hunting and trapping season after the firearms deer season for those with a specific interest in wolf hunting and trapping.

A total of 6,000 licenses will be offered, with 3,600 available in the early season and 2,400 in the late season. Late season licenses will be further split between hunting and trapping, with a minimum of 600 reserved for trappers. The target harvest quota will be 400 wolves for both seasons combined, and will initially be allocated equally between the early and the late seasons.

The early hunting only season will be open only in the northern portions of Minnesota where rifles are allowed for deer hunting. It will start on Saturday, Nov. 3, the opening day of firearms deer hunting. It will close either at the end of the respective firearms seasons in the two northern deer zones (Nov. 18 in Zone 1 or Nov. 11 in Zone 2), or when a registered target harvest quota of 200 is reached, whichever comes sooner.

The late hunting and trapping season will begin Saturday, Nov. 24. It will close Jan. 6, 2013, or when a registered total target harvest quota of 400 in both seasons combined is reached, whichever comes sooner. The late season will be open statewide.

"The DNR is taking a very conservative approach to this first season," said Steve Merchant, DNR wildlife populations program manager.

Total proposed licenses and target harvest quotas are consistent with DNR testimony during the Legislative session, Merchant said. While Minnesota's wolf population of approximately 3,000 animals likely could sustain a much higher harvest rate, this first season is designed to provide information on wolf hunting and trapping interest and success rates that will help inform the design and implementation of future seasons, Merchant said. The proposed season is consistent with the goal of the state's wolf management plan to assure the long term survival of the wolf and address conflicts between wolves and humans.
The DNR is also continuing to consult with tribal governments and tribal resource agency staff on the proposed state wolf season.

Wolves were returned to state management in January 2012 when they were delisted from the federal Endangered Species Act. Prior to their complete protection under federal law in 1974, wolves were unprotected under state law and DNR had no wolf management authority. This proposal marks the first regulated harvest season for wolves in state history.

Wolf numbers and their distribution have remained relatively stable for the past 10 years and have been well above the federal wolf recovery population goal since the late 1990s.

Merchant said wildlife experts took into account wolf damage control mortality when setting the harvest number. Typically, about 80 farms have verified wolf depredation complaints each year. Over the past several years, an average of 170 wolves have been captured or killed each year by federal trappers in response to verified livestock depredation. About 70 wolves have been trapped and killed so far this spring following verified livestock damage complaints, primarily on calves.

Wolf hunting licenses will be $30 for residents and $250 for nonresidents. Nonresidents will be limited to 5 percent of total hunting licenses. Wolf trapping licenses will be $30 (limited to residents only). A lottery will be held to select license recipients. Proof of a current or previous hunting license will be required to apply for a wolf license. The application fee will be $4.

The DNR is required by law to take public comment prior to implementing a wolf season. While decisions about whether to have a wolf season and when to start it have already been made through the lawmaking process, the DNR is seeking public comments on remaining details, many of which are outlined in this announcement. The complete proposal is available on the DNR website at http://www.mndnr.gov/wolves. Given how soon the season must be put in place, the DNR will only take comments through an online survey, also at http://www.mndnr.gov/wolves through June 20.

Specific details of the wolf season proposal include:

Season Structure
• The early wolf hunting season (legal firearms or archery) will be concurrent with the deer season and open only in that portion of the state where rifles can be used to hunt deer.
• The early season dates are Nov. 3-18 in Zone 1 (Series 100 deer permit areas – northeastern and east-central Minnesota) and Nov. 3-11 in the rifle zone portion of Zone 2 (Series 200 deer permit areas – central and northwestern Minnesota). The early season will close before those dates if the target harvest quota of 200 is reached sooner.
• No trapping will be allowed in the early season.
• The late hunting and trapping season will open Nov. 24 statewide. It will close Jan. 6 or when the total target harvest quota of 400 is met, whichever is sooner.
• Licensed wolf hunters will be responsible for checking each day to assure that the season is still open.
• The bag limit is one wolf per licensee.

Licensing
• A person cannot purchase both a hunting and a trapping license. A person with a hunting license may take a wolf only by firearms or archery; a person with a trapping license may take a wolf only by trap or snare.
• 3,600 licenses will be available for the early season and are only valid for the early season.
• 2,400 licenses will be available for the late season (at least 600 trapping) and are only valid for the late season.
• The number of hunting licenses offered to nonresidents will be capped at five percent for both the early and late seasons.

Application process
• Application materials will be available online on or around Aug. 1
• A person must have proof of a current or previous hunting license to apply
• Trappers born after Dec. 31, 1989, need a trapper education certificate or proof of a previous trapping license to purchase a wolf trapping license.
• The application deadline will be Sept. 6; online winner notification will be no later than Oct. 14. Licenses will be available for purchase no later than Oct. 15.
• Groups of up to four individuals many apply as a single group and may assist another licensed wolf hunter but may not shoot or tag for each other.
• Applicants can apply for only one of three license types: early wolf hunting; late wolf hunting; or late wolf trapping.

Registration
• All animals must be registered by the day following the day of harvest (can be done electronically at ELS agent or by phone).
• Harvest registration information/reporting will be available online and via a toll-free phone number.
• Carcasses must be surrendered for collection of biological data.
User avatar
bwca
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1551
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:00 pm
Location: Twin Cities

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 1
TagsWolf season, public comment, minnesota wolf season, 2012, gray wolf, timber wolf, grey wolf, wolf hunting

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby Rose Thoreson » Sat Jun 16, 2012 12:02 pm

hmmmmmmmmmmm..... sorry cant support the "NO" wolf hunt ... Just this morning we watched one walking on the bike path in front of the house ......we figured "at least something is using the billion dollar bike/walking path" ..... LOL ...... but ....... ummmmmm ...... NO! There must be some sort of control at some point! We live here too and they have no fear!
Rose Thoreson
 

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby Matt Lind » Sat Jun 16, 2012 12:03 pm

The wolves are finally back on my land in Chippewa National Forest and I'm excited. Wolves are not that dangerous to people. I can see the argument for the farmers. Since 2005, my family and I have been trying to replant a pine forest. 3 total trees have survived out of thousands due to the exploding deer population. I need those wolves on my lake!
Matt Lind
 

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby mybigworld » Mon Jun 18, 2012 1:24 pm

My two cents,
Wolves are not an endangered species, according to Wikipedia ( I know they aren't the most reliable resource) Canada alone has over 52,000 wolves. The United States wolf population declined because people started moving into wolf habitat and people and wolves don't mix. Wolves kill livestock, pets and people, though attacks by wolves on people are rare. Wolves are a nuisance to humans living near them, this is why their population was driven away.
Wolves also have a huge impact on deer population. I know several hunters who've seen a dramatic decline in deer populations in areas where wolves have been "re-introduced." What many people don't understand is the economic impact this has on communities in Northern MN. Hunters who travel from the south for what was once excellent deer hunting pumped a lot of money into the economies of many small northern cities. When hunters become frustrated with declining deer populations they stop traveling up North. The DNR has also limited the number of deer that can be harvested from these areas because wolves have decimated the deer population.
I get angry when I think of this so forgive me but these stupid people who think its so important to have wolves in MN really have their heads up their asses. If you really want to see wolves the trip to Canada is very simple; but then, there isn't any activity such as wolf watching. There is hardly a person out there who spends money to visit areas of wolf habitat to try and get a glimpse of a wolf. There is no reason to increase the wolf population in MN, none. You can sit back on your couch and think how neat it is that MN is saving its wolf population but do you really care about such a useless animal? There was a grizzly population in MN at one time should we re-introduce them as well? The millions of dollars spent on the MN wolf population could have been much better spent on helping to preserve our lakes and wildlife areas and to keeping the costs of fishing and hunting licenses in check.
If we are to help with the declining northern MN economy, a hunting season for wolf would be a huge help. These nuisance animals need to be kept in check (if not driven back to Canada all together!). In the future, more effort should be spent on conversation that is viable for all people of MN not just a bunch of idiots in the Twin Cities who think pictures of wolf cubs are just too cute!
mybigworld
 

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby Shirley Taggart » Mon Jun 25, 2012 9:04 pm

DNR Wolf Hunt Survey Results

Here are the results regarding public opinion on wolf hunting and trapping.

Isn't it interesting that this bill was introduced, promoted, and pushed by the DNR. Legislators agreed despite opposition and Gov. Dayton allowed it to pass despite opposition. Now, with overwhelming poll opposition, the DNR said it will move forward as planned as it is the law -- a law they wanted and seem to be using as a shield now to protect their actions. My opinion, they will ride out the negative feedback and continue as planned. People have choices - animals don't. Trapping is cruel and barbaric - inhumane in every sense of the word. In addition, innocent untargeted animals will be caught and suffer. What do I plan to do: First of all, I will not vote for my legislators if they voted "yes" to this bill...regardless of political party affiliation. Gov. Dayton also will not get my vote if he should run for a second term. The legislators can amend this wolf hunting and trapping bill. I will write them each a courteous, respectful letter stating my position. What else will I do - This is a great State. There are numerous outdoor things to do without paying any fees, purchasing any licenses, or donating on my income tax filing. The DNR does not deserve my money. I'll spend it elsewhere. Spread the Word and Voice your Opinion - your vote is important to the people we send to St. Paul. Who should we send?

From Howling for Wolves: "Minnesotans have used their only opportunity provided for an official public comment to overwhelmingly oppose the planned wolf hunting and trapping season proposed by the DNR, with almost 80 percent of the more than 7,300 participants registering their opposition.

Despite overwhelming opposition, the DNR is moving forward with their plans undeterred. But we are also undeterred and we will continue making every effort to stop this upcoming "public take" of wolves in Minnesota.

We know the Minnesota Statute actually says "...the commissioner may prescribe open seasons...", so the decision to offer a wolf hunting and trapping season is legally at the discretion of the DNR and is not something mandated by law. We are making plans to inform the public about this.

For now, we need you to spread the word about this law and gather support for the next phase. "
Shirley Taggart
 

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby bwca » Thu Dec 13, 2012 2:29 pm

Minnesota's first early wolf season concluded on November 24th, 2012 with 147 wolves being killed. The late season began that day as well for both hunting and trapping. The late season will continue through January 31st, 2013. What is your opinion of wolf hunting in Minnesota?
User avatar
bwca
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1551
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:00 pm
Location: Twin Cities

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 1
Tagswolf hunting, minnesota, wolf season, hunting wolves, hunting season, endangered, wolves, timberwolves, timberwolf, gray wolf, grey wolf

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby PaddlerJimmy » Thu Dec 13, 2012 2:52 pm

I don't think wolves should be hunted.

Wolf-Hunting-2by6341.jpg
Photographer Unknown
Wolf-Hunting-2by6341.jpg (28.99 KiB) Viewed 7862 times


lrg-70-2006-wolf-hunt-053.jpg
Photographer Unknown


predator-wolf-3-large.jpg
Photographer Unknown
User avatar
PaddlerJimmy
 
Posts: 331
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 9:18 am

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby PaddlerJimmy » Thu Dec 13, 2012 2:55 pm

newwolf4.jpg
Photographer Unknown
newwolf4.jpg (16.62 KiB) Viewed 7862 times


alberta-wolf-hunting.jpg
Photographer Unknown


wolf1.jpg
Photographer Unknown
wolf1.jpg (47.04 KiB) Viewed 7862 times
User avatar
PaddlerJimmy
 
Posts: 331
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 9:18 am

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Re: Grey Wolf Delisting and Hunting

Postby PaddlerJimmy » Thu Dec 13, 2012 3:29 pm

248322_10151320302570050_1394601039_n.jpg
Photographer Unknown
248322_10151320302570050_1394601039_n.jpg (27.35 KiB) Viewed 7860 times


2007-Wolf_Hunt2.jpg
Photographer Unknown
2007-Wolf_Hunt2.jpg (14.42 KiB) Viewed 7860 times


Wolf_hunt-085.jpg
Photographer Unknown
Wolf_hunt-085.jpg (15.1 KiB) Viewed 7860 times


pup1.jpg
Photographer Unknown


pup2.jpg
Photographer Unknown
pup2.jpg (9.2 KiB) Viewed 7860 times
User avatar
PaddlerJimmy
 
Posts: 331
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 9:18 am

Invitations sent: 0
Referrals: 0

Next

Return to Misc - Controversies

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron